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The Basics of Tree Pruning

MERISTEM TIPS :: VASCULAR SYSTEM :: TRANSPIRATION :: THE 1/3 RULE
THE BRANCH COLLAR :: TARGET PRUNING :: CONCLUSION :: GLOSSARY


THE BRANCH COLLAR
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The branch collar is the point where a branch joins the trunk or another branch. This is the area the arborist chooses to make a proper cut.

 

The wrinkles in the branch collar are the tree’s first line of defense against the invasion of micro-organisms. The final cut should be made just outside these wrinkles.

 


In good pruning technique, a surgical cut preserves the branch collar, and should be made square to the diameter of the stem. This produces the smallest theoretical wound. If a cut is made on the diagonal, it creates a larger oval sloping cut, which is much harder for the wound to heal.

 

 

A large branch should be dismantled from the tip back. This method takes the weight off the branch and greatly reduces the possibility of tearing the bark and creating a more egregious wound. The finished cut is then made just outside the branch collar.

 

 
     

I.S.A. Certified Arborist WE-4370A

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